Gypsy Moth Update

If the rain would stop for more than a moment, we could all venture outside and observe the welcome signs of spring, like birds chirping, and flowers and leaves sprouting. And,unfortunately, we could also observe some of the less welcome signs of spring … , like, Gypsy Moth caterpillars. Last year,Gypsy Moth damage in Rockaway, Jefferson, West Milford and parts of Sussex County was severe, and egg mass counts for this year indicate another infestation will occur in these areas.  Areas that are close in proximity to last year’s ‘hot zones’ can also expect to have an increased incidence of damage from this pest, as the insects are spread by wind and other means. The defoliation that occurs to trees when Gypsy Moth populations are high causes severe stress to trees.  Deciduous trees are ‘designed’ to put out one crop of leaves each year. When a tree loses that crop of leaves from Gypsy moths, or any other reason, the tree must expend its ‘reserves’ to grow new leaves.  This leaves the tree in a precarious condition. Properly timed foliar sprays can prevent damage to your trees. Insecticide sprays will kill caterpillars on contact and will also kill caterpillars when they eat the tainted leaves. Naturally occurring  bacteria sprays, called, BT, which is short for Bacillus Thuringiensis, are also an effective means to mitigate damage from Gypsy Moth Caterpillars. This material causes an internal reaction in the caterpillar once it eats a tainted leaf. During severe infestations two treatments of insecticide or BT to your trees is highly recommended. Some areas that were severely affected last year are designated...
Emerald Ash Borer Affecting Northern New Jersey

Emerald Ash Borer Affecting Northern New Jersey

Early Detection is a key factor in the effective treatment of Emerald Ash Borer Presentation about the Emerald Ash Borer to the Hanover Township Committee: What is an Emerald Ash Borer? A dark green, metallic bug shaped like a bullet, and it feeds on the leaves of ash trees. The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) infestation is difficult to detect in the early stages, but the damage can be severe if not prevented properly. EABs were not identified in America until 2002, and has been characterized as the most invasive forest insect to invade North America. Since the discovery of the EAB, it is estimated that the insect has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees. Native to China, Russia, Japan and Korea, the EAB travelled to North America through wooden packing materials, or imported firewood. Insects that tend to be confused as an EAB are Honey Suckle Flat Headed Borers, Click Beetles, Six-Spotted Tiger Beetles, Green Ground Beetles and more. What are the signs? Heavily infested trees will display canopy die-back, which is when the top of the tree thins out Yellow or wilted foliage, or decreased density of healthy-looking leaves Many small holes, like ones a woodpecker may impress upon wood Exit holes in the shape of a capital D, creating an emergence hole that is about 1/8 inch in diameter Epicormic sprouting, which is when new growth tries to survive on dead or distressed wood Splitting or cracking of bark Interesting Facts About the EAB The EAB threatens the source of ash trees The most extensive damage is done during the larva stage(larval), because the EAB larva...
PEST ALERT in Northern New Jersey

PEST ALERT in Northern New Jersey

Damaging population levels of Gypsy Moth and other leaf feeding insects have been observed in our service area: Based on observations of Gypsy Moth activity this past year we expect an increase in the population for 2016 in Northwestern areas of Morris and Sussex Counties.  As many homeowners know, Gypsy Moth feeding can cause serious harm or damage to trees and shrubs.  In addition to the hazard to the plants, anyone who has experienced a past infestation can attest to the “unpleasantness” of the caterpillars and their droppings. When leaf feeding insect populations are this high, damage to trees can be severe. Gypsy Moths cannot be eradicated but spraying can minimize damage to the landscape. Two sprays are usually sufficient to control damage to trees but in heavy infested areas a third may be necessary. Along with the leaf feeding insects that damage trees, diseases from insects are becoming more serious — and common! The US Center for Disease Control (CDC) tracks statistics on tick-transmitted illnesses, and offers advice for staying safe. The CDC recommends applying pesticides in your yard to control tick populations. When applied properly, tick pesticides are extremely effective for tick control. If you are not already scheduled for treatments for controlling either leaf feeding insects or ticks and would like a price quote or more information on treating these problems, please contact us at (973) 335-6650 to consult with our Certified...

Congratulations to Mark Sandor, CTSP

We are proud to announce that Mark Sandor, of Greenwood Tree Experts of Montville, NJ recently completed the Certified Treecare Safety Professional (CTSP) program offered by the Tree Care Industry Association.  The CTSP program allows one or more key employees at a given company to become certified tree care safety experts, thereby empowering and encouraging a culture of safety within that organization. So, well done, Mark! He worked hard to complete this training! We are proud to have him on the Greenwood Tree Experts team. Mark joins the three other CTSP’s we have on staff Mike Hall, Lloyd Lisk and Brad Nilson What that means…… Maintaining a Certified Tree Care Safety Professional on staff means that organizations are committed to safe practices in arboricultural operations.  CTSP’s are kept abreast of the latest technological advances and regulatory activities affecting the industry through the TCIA safety network, and must commit to ongoing education in the safety field in order to maintain their certification. Because safety regulations and industry standards are continually evolving, the ongoing education requirement is vital to maintaining a legitimate safety program within a given company. In order to fulfill program requirements, CTSP’s must complete a study guide, attend a two-day training workshop, and pass a rigorous exam.  Once certified, CTSP’s must complete at least 30 hours of training others, or receiving education themselves, every three years. Consumers can have greater peace of mind with the knowledge that hiring a tree care company with a CTSP on staff helps to ensure safe and professional arboricultural work on their property. About the Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA): www.treecaretips.org. For more information about the...
Winter is Bark’s Time to Shine

Winter is Bark’s Time to Shine

  The “Let’s Talk About Parks” series is designed to encourage exploration and discovery of Pittsburgh’s urban parks. With most tree leaves now on the ground — and unseasonably warm December weather — now is a great time for the secret world of tree bark to have its moment in the sun. A winter hike in Frick, Highland, Riverview or Schenley Park is a great way to see myriad types of bark and to use bark characteristics to identify trees. The ridges, furrows, colors and textures of bark often can tell you the exact species of a tree. Our city parks have a wide palette of trees with wonderfully distinct bark. Read...
Maple Sugaring

Maple Sugaring

Maple syrup is winter’s sugary treasure! The sap is flowing and the sugaring season is underway at the Great Swamp OEC. Come experience all the sweet sights and smells at a maple sugaring demonstration. Discover the process from start to finish by identifying and tapping maple trees, collecting sap, and seeing syrup made over a wood-fired evaporator. Think you can identify the differences between maple syrups? Taste test three distinct maple syrups and let us know which one you enjoy the most! Date: January 17, 18, 24, 25 & 31 February 7, 8, 14, 15, 21, 22 & 28 March 1, 7 & 8 Time: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. Location: Great Swamp Outdoor Education Center, 247 Southern Blvd., Chatham Township Cost: $3 per person ages 3 & up Contact:...
THE ARBORIST

THE ARBORIST

Interesting video of what our arborist go through in their daily routine.  
Winter Tree Care Savings

Winter Tree Care Savings

Happy New Year! We hope that 2015 is off to a fabulous start. Our team here at Greenwood is happy to be back at it after a relaxing holiday with our families. January is the perfect month to start focusing on your landscape needs. For many this is a slow time of the year, the work you do now will pay big dividends come spring. There are many reasons why winter pruning — also know as dormant landscape pruning — can be an effective and cost-efficient method of ensuring the future health and sustained growth of your valuable trees and shrubs. Allows For Easier Access to Equipment During the winter months, because of the harder, frozen ground, heavy equipment can be moved closer to the trees without damaging the roots or soil. This results in cost savings for you because it takes our crew less time and effort to complete the job. Stimulates Growth Cycle Pruning during winter months does not interrupt the nutrient and growth cycle but rather reduces the number of buds that need to share the food resources in the roots, so the remaining buds grow more vigorously the next spring. Minimizes Damage To The Surrounding Landscape Pruning during the spring and summer months can often result in damage to the surrounding plants and flowers. It is also very hard to clean the small branches that fall into flowerbeds. Protecting the landscape below the tree completely during pruning is time consuming and can add to the cost of the job. Less Risk Of Diseases Spreading Pruning during winter can reduce the spread of disease that enter...